How to Make an Ethernet Cable Connection

Before you begin, you should know which wiring scheme you will be using. The only difference between 568A and 568B wiring is that pairs 2 and 3 (orange and green) are swapped. If you are unsure which one to use then you should go with the 568B diagram. It is the 568B diagram that we demonstrate in this tutorial and the 568A wiring is shown in the diagrams below mainly for illustration. In our estimation the 568B connection is used in over 99% of all straight through applications. Know that using either the A or B standard will produce a “straight through” connection that should work for any Ethernet or POE (power over Ethernet) application. Therefore do not sweat over the choice.

Cable Connection
Note: To make a crossover patch cable, you should wire one end 568B and the other end 568A

Notes:
1) The RJ-45 plugs are normally made for either solid conductors or stranded conductors. It is very important to be sure that the plug that you use matches the conductor type. It is extremely difficult to tell the difference between the two by looking at them.

2) Ordinarily, it would be taboo to untwist the pairs of any category 5 or 6 cable. The one exception to this rule is when crimping on RJ-45 plugs. It would be impossible to insert the wires into the channels without first untwisting and straightening them. Be sure not to extend the un-twisting, past the skin point. If you do it properly, you will wind up with no more than 1/2″ of untwisted conductors (up to 1/2″ of untwist meets the cat 5 or 6 specification).

3) If the completed assembly does not pass continuity, you may have a problem in one, or both ends. First try giving each end another crimp. If that does not work, then carefully examine each end. Are the wires in the proper order? Do all of the wires fully extend to the end of the connector? Are all of the pins pushed down fully. Cut off the suspected bad connector, and re-terminate it. If you still have a problem, then repeat the process, this time giving more scrutiny to the end that was not replaced.

568B vs. 568A: For patch cables, 568-B wiring is by far, the most common wiring method. Virtually all pre-assembled patch cables are wired to the B standard. There is no difference in connectivity between 568B and 568A cables. Therefore, a 568B patch cable should work fine on a 568A cabling system, and visa-versa.